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Discover Manchester’s Finest Public Art: A Guide to Sculpture Manchester Landmarks

From the enduring presence of Abraham Lincoln in Lincoln Square to the innovation of Lazerian Studio’s modern works, ‘Sculpture Manchester’ epitomises an artistic timeline bridging historical grandeur and contemporary innovation. This article will guide you through the city’s captivating public art, revealing the locations and legacies that shape Manchester’s streets and parks.

Key Takeaways

  • Manchester’s vibrant public art scene reflects its rich historical legacy and embraces contributions from the Victorian era, the US Civil War connection, and notable sculptors like John Cassidy, as well as iconic bronze statues of Abraham Lincoln, Duke of Wellington, and Alan Turing.
  • The city’s contemporary public art projects by studios like Lazerian not only add modern aesthetics but also engage with themes of sustainability and environmental consciousness, with projects such as Recover E and Message in a Bottle.
  • Manchester commemorates its history and cultural significance through various forms of public art, including tribute monuments like the Victory Over Blindness, The Tree of Remembrance, and the Homeless Jesus statues, as well as garden sculptures like the Vimto Monument and outdoor galleries that showcase diverse sculptural works.
Emmeline Pankhurst staute on display in MAnchester city centre as part of a Manchester artist and creative desiggn city

Manchester’s Rich Sculpture History

Manchester has a rich history filled with sculptures. Its streets, parks, and gardens have served as a canvas for artists, hosting a multitude of statues and monuments. From tributes to monarchs to commemorations of historic events, these public art pieces have added depth and character to the city’s landscape.

Exploring Manchester’s sculpture history, we traverse various epochs, each making its unique imprint on the city’s public art. We’ll explore the Victorian era, a golden age of public art, delve into the city’s connection to the US Civil War, and pay homage to John Cassidy, one of Manchester’s most prolific sculptors.

Victorian Manchester: The Golden Age of Public Art

Manchester experienced a significant artistic boom during the Victorian era. Public spaces were adorned with stunning sculptures, turning the urban landscape into an open-air museum. Notable installations from this era include the over-life-size bronze statue of Queen Victoria in Peel Park, Salford, crafted by Matthew Noble in 1857, and another significant sculpture of Victoria situated at Manchester Art Gallery.

The public art of this era was influenced by a variety of artistic movements and themes, including:

  • Classicism
  • Romanticism
  • Social reform
  • Technological progress

Artists such as John Cassidy, Joshua Anderson Hague, and James Hey Davies played significant roles in shaping Manchester’s public art scene during this period, leaving a lasting legacy in bronze and stone.

Manchester and the US Civil War: A Historic Link

Manchester’s unique link to the US Civil War is embodied by the striking figure of Abraham Lincoln standing proudly in the city. Crafted by George Grey Barnard after the end of the First World War, the statue commemorates Manchester’s support for the Union cause during the Civil War, a testament to the city’s allegiance with the fight against slavery.

The statue not only serves as a poignant reminder of Manchester’s historic connection to the US Civil War but also celebrates the city’s role as a crucial ally to Abraham Lincoln’s Union. This alliance was acknowledged by Lincoln himself in a letter expressing gratitude to the ‘working men of Manchester’ for their anti-slavery position, a letter that is now proudly displayed in Manchester Cathedral.

John Cassidy: Manchester’s Prolific Sculptor

John Cassidy, an Irish sculptor and painter, significantly influenced Manchester’s public art landscape. His works, shaped by the ‘New Sculpture’ movement, can be seen throughout the city, serving as focal points in public spaces.

Among Cassidy’s notable creations is the poignant artwork, Adrift, which portrays a family holding onto a raft in turbulent waters, capturing the essence of hardship and resilience. Another of his significant works is the Life Cycle statue, which symbolizes movement, progress, and the ongoing momentum of life in Greater Manchester.

John Cassidy Barber- Manchester artist - a vintage style painting of the Manchester artist who is a white man, middle aged with a beard. He has his fist under his chin lening and looking at a small statue that is his own artwork sculpture

Iconic Bronze Statues in Manchester

Venturing deeper into Manchester’s rich sculpture history reveals a series of iconic bronze statues, each narrating its own unique tale. From the historic Abraham Lincoln bronze sculpture to the figure of the Duke of Wellington and the representation of Alan Turing, these statues stand as commemorations of influential figures who have shaped the city’s history and the global community.

Crafted by renowned sculptors such as George Gray Barnard and Glyn Hughes, these statues are not only aesthetically pleasing but also carry a wealth of historical, cultural, and academic significance. Each statue adds to the city’s artistic landscape, creating a unique blend of history and art that characterizes Manchester’s public spaces.

Abraham Lincoln: A Symbol of Friendship

More than just symbolizing the iconic American president, the Abraham Lincoln statue standing tall in Manchester holds deeper meanings. It serves as a symbol of friendship between Manchester and the United States, a testament to the city’s support for the Union cause during the US Civil War.

Crafted by George Grey Barnard, the statue was unveiled in 1919, marking the enduring bond between Manchester and the United States. Today, it stands as a reminder of this historic connection, inviting onlookers to reflect on the city’s role in a pivotal period of American history.

Abraham_Lincoln,_Lincoln_Square,_Manchester. Part of a Manchester sculpture by Manchester artist
Duke of Wellington- Manchester sculpture statue. Crafted by Manchester artist Matthew Noble, the statue sculpted serves as a powerful reminder of the Duke’s military prowess and his significant contributions to the nation. Its symbolic elements underscore the values of wisdom, valour, and victory, marking it as an artistic masterpiece in the city’s collection of public art.

Duke of Wellington: Wisdom and Valour Personified

The Duke of Wellington statue in Manchester is a tribute to one of the most influential figures in British history. Here are some key details about the statue:

  • It stands at 13 feet tall.
  • The statue portrays the Duke in his later years, dressed in military clothing.
  • It is accompanied by allegorical figures of Minerva, Mars, and Victory, symbolizing wisdom, valour, and triumph.

Crafted by Matthew Noble, the statue sculpted serves as a powerful reminder of the Duke’s military prowess and his significant contributions to the nation. Its symbolic elements underscore the values of wisdom, valour, and victory, marking it as an artistic masterpiece in the city’s collection of public art.

Alan Turing: Father of Computer Science

Another iconic bronze statue in Manchester is that of Alan Turing, known as the father of computer science. Turing’s pivotal role in deciphering the Enigma code during the Second World War is well-documented, marking him as a key figure in the history of technology.

The statue, created by Glyn Hughes, captures Turing seated on a bench, holding an apple. This symbolizes the forbidden fruit of knowledge and reflects Turing’s status as a pioneering figure in computer science. Located in Sackville Park, the statue is a tribute to Turing’s lasting influence on technology and history.

The statue, created by Glyn Hughes, captures Turing seated on a bench, holding an apple. This symbolizes the forbidden fruit of knowledge and reflects Turing’s status as a pioneering figure in computer science. Located in Sackville Park, the statue is a tribute to Turing’s lasting influence on technology and history. Sculpture Manchester most famous sculpture

Manchester’s Vibrant Contemporary Sculpture Scene

In addition to reflecting Manchester’s rich history through classic sculptures, the city also prides itself on a lively contemporary sculpture scene. Innovative studios like Lazerian are pushing boundaries in art and design, creating unique projects like Recover E, and thought-provoking works like Message in a Bottle.

These contemporary works, while varied in style and subject, share a common focus on individuality and sustainability. They add a modern touch to the city’s public art scene, serving as a focal point that showcases the creative spirit of Manchester’s artists and their ability to transform everyday materials into extraordinary works of art.

Manchester artist and Manchester design Liam Hopkins of Lazerian paper dog and Lazerian logo gerald on display in his Manchester workshop and studio

Lazerian Studio: Pushing Boundaries in Art and Design

Lazerian Studio stands out in Manchester’s contemporary sculpture scene. Founded by Liam Hopkins, the studio is known for its innovative approach to design, creating bespoke products and experiences that push the boundaries of art.

Lazerian’s projects, like the public art sculpture in Winsford Town Park and the Gerald the paper dog sculpture, have been exhibited internationally, garnering critical acclaim for their unique designs. The studio’s focus on individuality and sustainability adds a fresh perspective to Manchester’s public art scene, turning ordinary materials into extraordinary works of art.

Recover E: A Unique Formula E Racing Car Sculpture

Recover E, a project by Lazerian Studio, is a 1:1 moving replica of a Formula E racing car made from electronic waste. The sculpture, located in Manchester, is a testament to the studio’s commitment to sustainability and innovation.

The project aims to:

  • Raise awareness about the importance of recycling and reducing electronic waste
  • Showcase Lazerian’s creative approach to design, transforming discarded materials into a dynamic and thought-provoking sculpture
  • Add a unique touch to Manchester’s public art scene
  • Serve as a reminder of the role art can play in promoting sustainable practices.
A race car by Manchester artist and Manchester maker Liam Hopkins of Lazerian. Made entirely from electronic waste for Formula E team Envision Racing
Message in a bottle artwork and sculpture by Manchester artist, Manchester maker and designer Liam Hopkins of Lazerian. Its a plastic sculpture to highlight the sustainability and eco-dedsign message

Message in a Bottle: Lazerian’s Thought-Provoking Project

Message in a Bottle is another project by Lazerian that encourages reflection on environmental issues. Developed in collaboration with whiskey brand Bruichladdich for Earth Day, the sculpture is made from Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), a highly recyclable plastic.

The project aims to promote awareness about environmental issues and the importance of recycling. The sculpture, constructed from PET plastic bottles, invites viewers to reflect on their environmental impact. It serves as a stark reminder of the urgent need for sustainable practices in our daily lives, making it a thought-provoking addition to Manchester’s public art scene.

Commemorative Monuments and Memorials in Manchester

Monuments and memorials form a crucial component of Manchester’s public art landscape. They serve as tangible reminders of the city’s past, commemorating key events and individuals who have shaped its history. From the Victory Over Blindness statue honoring WWI ex-servicemen to the Homeless Jesus statue challenging attitudes towards homelessness, these monuments invite onlookers to reflect on the city’s past and its implications on the present.

These commemorative pieces, while diverse in their subject matter, share a commitment to preserving the city’s history. They offer a visual narrative of the city’s past, adding depth and context to Manchester’s vibrant public art scene.

Victory Over Blindness: Honoring WWI Ex-Servicemen

The Victory Over Blindness statue is a poignant tribute to the WWI ex-servicemen who lost their sight during the Great War. Situated outside Manchester Piccadilly station, the statue symbolizes the resilience of these veterans as they rebuilt their lives after the war.

Created by Johanna Domke-Guyot, the statue was unveiled in 2018, marking the centenary of the end of the First World War. It serves as a powerful reminder of the sacrifices made by these servicemen and the enduring spirit of resilience and courage that defined their journey.

The Victory Over Blindness statue is a poignant tribute to the WWI ex-servicemen who lost their sight during the Great War. Situated outside Manchester Piccadilly station, the statue symbolizes the resilience of these veterans as they rebuilt their lives after the war. Created by Johanna Domke-Guyot, the statue was unveiled in 2018, marking the centenary of the end of the First World War. It serves as a powerful reminder of the sacrifices made by these servicemen and the enduring spirit of resilience and courage that defined their journey.

Tree of Remembrance: A Tribute to WWII Civilians

The Tree of Remembrance, situated within a landscape designed by renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando, is a tribute to the civilians of Manchester who lost their lives during WWII. The sculpture, created by Wolfgang Buttress and Fiona Heron, is a powerful symbol of loss and remembrance.

Unveiled in May 2005, on the anniversary of V E Day, the tree serves as a visual reminder of the city’s resilience in the face of adversity. It invites onlookers to reflect on the impact of war on civilian lives, adding a poignant touch to Manchester’s collection of public art.

Homeless Jesus: Challenging Attitudes Towards Homelessness

One of Manchester’s newest additions to its collection of public art is the Homeless Jesus statue. Created by Canadian artist Timothy Schmalz, the statue represents Jesus as a homeless person, sleeping on a park bench.

Located in St Ann’s Square, the statue:

  • invites onlookers to reflect on the issue of homelessness
  • challenges societal attitudes towards the homeless
  • serves as a call to compassion and understanding
  • underscores the role of public art in sparking social dialogue and promoting change.
Homeless Jesus statue on a bench in central Manchester. A symbolic part of the Manchester art scene. The Jesus figure is covered with a sheet but you can tell its Jesus due to the injured feet

Garden and Outdoor Sculptures in Manchester

Beyond cityscapes, Manchester’s gardens and parks, including Piccadilly Gardens, also showcase various sculptures. From the quirky Vimto Monument to the steel tribute to the beloved children’s TV show Blue Peter, these garden and outdoor sculptures add a touch of whimsy to the city’s public art scene.

These sculptures, often inspired by local culture and history, offer a fresh perspective on public art. Whether it’s a tribute to a local beverage or a modern stainless steel masterpiece, they showcase the diversity and creativity of Manchester’s public art scene.

Vimto Monument: Celebrating a Local Beverage

The Vimto Monument, situated on Sackville Street, is a tribute to the renowned non-alcoholic beverage, Vimto. The monument stands on the very spot where Vimto was originally created in 1908, marking a significant moment in the city’s history.

The monument, erected in 1992, is a quirky addition to Manchester’s collection of public art. It serves as a reminder of the city’s vibrant cultural history, inviting onlookers to reflect on the origins of this beloved local beverage.

The monument stands on the very spot where Vimto was originally created in 1908, marking a significant moment in the city’s history. The monument, erected in 1992, is a quirky addition to Manchester’s collection of public art. It serves as a reminder of the city’s vibrant cultural history, inviting onlookers to reflect on the origins of this beloved local beverage.

Blue Peter Ship: A Steel Tribute to a Beloved TV Show

The Blue Peter Ship sculpture, located in MediaCity, Salford, is a tribute to the world’s longest-running children’s TV show, Blue Peter. The sculpture, created by artist Steve Blaylock, is a representation of the enduring legacy of the show.

Crafted from cold cast bronze, the sculpture is a perfect blend of nostalgia and contemporary design. It serves as a visual reminder of the show’s impact on generations of viewers, adding a touch of childhood nostalgia to Manchester’s public art scene.

A metal sculpture of a interpretation of the iconic Blue Peter ship which is displayed in the iconic Blue Peter garden
The Face of Wigan is a modern stainless steel masterpiece that adds a contemporary touch to the city’s public art. Unveiled in 2008, the sculpture is an imposing figure, constructed from numerous stainless steel strips meticulously welded together. Created by Rick Kirby, the sculpture represents the diverse faces of Wigan, symbolizing the people of the city. It serves as a visual narrative of the city’s identity, adding depth and context to Manchester’s vibrant public art scene.

Face of Wigan: A Modern Stainless Steel Masterpiece

The Face of Wigan is a modern stainless steel masterpiece that adds a contemporary touch to the city’s public art. Unveiled in 2008, the sculpture is an imposing figure, constructed from numerous stainless steel strips meticulously welded together.

Created by Rick Kirby, the sculpture represents the diverse faces of Wigan, symbolizing the people of the city. It serves as a visual narrative of the city’s identity, adding depth and context to Manchester’s vibrant public art scene.

Manchester’s Sculpture Galleries and Exhibitions

Manchester, beyond its outdoor sculptures and public art, is also home to a vibrant array of sculpture galleries and exhibitions, exhibiting a wide range of works from leading artisans and sculptors. Some of the notable galleries and exhibitions in Manchester past and present include:

  • Sculpture Gallery UK: The largest collection of sculptures in the UK
  • Artisan House Wall Art: Specializing in contemporary metal wall sculptures
  • Wildlife Sculptures: Showcasing beautiful wildlife sculptures

These galleries and exhibitions offer a unique way to explore the city’s art scene.

These galleries and exhibitions showcase the city’s commitment to promoting and preserving the art of sculpture. They offer a platform for artists to display their works, fostering a culture of appreciation and understanding of this unique art form.

A image of the building- The Whitworth- a gallery and hub for Manchester artists

Sculpture Gallery UK: The Largest Collection of Sculptures in the UK

Housed in the City Art Gallery building, Sculpture Gallery UK is proud to maintain the UK’s largest sculpture collection. The gallery showcases a variety of sculptures made of Porcelain, Resin, and Solid Bronze, featuring works from renowned artists like Michelangelo, Bernini, and Rodin.

The gallery not only serves as a platform for the city’s publicly owned sculpture collection but also promotes the appreciation and accessibility of sculptures through various exhibitions. It invites visitors to explore the diverse world of sculptures, offering a unique insight into the city’s rich artistic heritage.

Wildlife Sculptures: Celebrating Nature’s Beauty

Featuring works by some of Britain’s top artists, Manchester’s wildlife sculptures are a tribute to the beauty of nature. These sculptures, crafted from various materials, capture the essence of animals in a unique and artistic way.

From the intricate works of Peter Hand to the imposing Bee sculptures, these wildlife sculptures offer a fresh perspective on public art. They invite viewers to appreciate the beauty and diversity of the natural world, adding a touch of nature to the city’s urban landscapes.

Summary

From its rich history reflected in its Victorian public art to its vibrant contemporary sculpture scene, Manchester’s public art offers a unique way to explore the city’s cultural and historical landscape. Each statue, monument, and sculpture tells a story, adding depth and context to the city’s identity.

Whether you’re an art enthusiast or a history buff, Manchester’s public art scene has something to offer everyone. From the iconic bronze statues to the innovative works of Lazerian Studio, the city’s public art scene is a testament to its creativity and cultural diversity. As we conclude this journey, we invite you to explore Manchester’s public art and experience its rich history and vibrant contemporary art scene firsthand.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is one of the most famous statues in Manchester?

The famous statue in Manchester is of Alan Turing.

What is the composer statue in Manchester?

The composer statue in Manchester is a 2.5 metre wide stylized bronze statue of Fryderyk Chopin, unveiled on Deansgate in the city center on September 16th, 2011. It is the largest statue of Chopin outside of Poland.

Who is considered one of the most famous contemporary sculptors?

One of the most notable famous contemporary sculptors is Jeff Koons, an American artist known for his work in New York City.

What is considered contemporary sculpture?

Contemporary sculpture is considered a malleable space for reflection, allowing artists to experiment with techniques and materials while reflecting on societal issues through figurative or abstract representation.

Who is the most famous sculpture maker?

Michelangelo Buonarroti is perhaps the most famous sculpture maker of the early Renaissance, widely praised for his work as an improvement upon the perfection of antiquity.

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